Halal Makeup is the Future of the Beauty Industry

Not just another trend

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If you want to make it in the beauty industry today, there’s little chance you’d go far if your products aren’t cruelty-free or vegan. But are brands ready for another benchmark to reach? Looks like they might have to. Halal beauty is on the rise. 

It’s about time, as Muslim women have been some of the highest beauty spenders in the world for long enough. But when it comes to buying products that abide by Islamic rules, they’ve always had to pay premium price. That’s why the halal cosmetics market, mostly made up of niche brands, was worth $23 billion in 2018.

It’s expected to reach $50 billion by 2025. Why? A report by Grand View Research estimates it’s because Muslims make up 23 percent of the global population. But halal beauty hitting the mainstream probably has something to do with Gen Z’s assertiveness. What else can you expect from the generation that unapologetically pushes forward a collective eco-ethical consciousness? If the numbers are any indication, religious inclusion is next. 

As it played out with the rise of cruelty-free and vegan labels, brands will soon enough be obligated to abide by halal certifications – which actually would not be difficult to do considering much of what constitutes ‘halal’ overlaps with cruelty-free and vegan requirements. 

In simple terms, halal make-up cannot include ingredients made of animal-derivatives (pork, in particular) and cannot contain alcohol or harmful chemicals. And as far as nail polishes go, the laqueur needs to allow water to permeate in order for Muslim women to be able to conduct wudu before prayer. 

But whilst the mainstream catches up, we’ve rounded up some of our favourite halal brands for you. 

Shade M

“Shade M is made for every woman that’s been overlooked in the mainstream” reads their website. Founded by Nour Khalifa and Jolie Nubani, you’ll find a wide range of halal-certified lipsticks. But it’s the brand’s collaborations that sets them apart—Shade M has partnered up with some the biggest Muslim beauty influencers out there. 

Zahara

When it comes to shopping for halal polishes, the colour selection can be pretty limited. But this France-based brand is constantly dropping new looks. 

Nailberry

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Love You Very Matcha. . . . A stunning khaki that goes with every outfit, especially beige and browns. Our verdant-hued polish evokes visions of luscious forests and twisting vines. . . . Our L’Oxygéné polishes are formulated without Phthalates, including DBP, Toluene, Formaldehyde, Formaldehyde Resin, Camphor, Xylene, Ethyl Tosylamide, Triphenyl Phosphate, Alcohol, Parabens, Animal Derivatives and Gluten. . . . Feel good, look great and colour your nails healthy! . . . #nailberry #loveyouverymatcha #khaki #khakinails #summerwedding #colourful #weddingseason #crueltyfreebeauty #vegan #halal #halalbeauty #nailhealth #nails #manicure #nailpolish #beauty #wellbeing #inspiration #manicure #pedicure #colourfulnails

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Aside from their stunning collections, Nailberry is particularly known for their formula—which, unlike many on the market, won’t chip right away. 

Inika Organic

Having been around since 2006, Inika is probably one of the most recognized vegan-brands – but what many don’t know is that it’s also certified halal. 

Shiffa Beauty

Founded by Dubai-native Lamees Hamdan, Shiffa has been around since 2004. It’s not technically certified halal, but Hamdan sources all her ingredients from the Middle East and nearby regions and fit the criteria.

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